Mission Dolores church exterior
Credit: sanfranman59 / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

Designated Landmarks and Landmark Districts

As a function of the Landmark Designation Program, the intent of designation is to protect, preserve, enhance and encourage continued utilization, rehabilitation and, where necessary, adaptive use of significant cultural resources. Landmarks and Landmark Districts are unique and irreplaceable assets to the city and its neighborhoods and provide examples of the physical surroundings in which past generations lived. 

Proposed Individual Landmarks and Landmark Districts: the Department and HPC regularly review the status of individual Landmarks and Landmark Districts. View most recent update (April 2021).

On June 15, 2011, the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) adopted its Landmark Designation Work Program. Since then, the Work Program has grown to include over 50 individual properties and six historic districts for landmark designation.

As staff to the Historic Preservation Commission, the Planning Department is conducting additional research, documentation, and public outreach related to these proposed designations, based on racial and social equity priorities.

In addition, the Board of Supervisors can initiate the landmark process, and Department staff conducts additional research, documentation and public outreach related to these as well. 

Lyon-Martin House, 651 Duncan Street – San Francisco's 292nd Landmark

Lyon Martin House The Lyon-Martin House is significant for association with the development of the homophile movement in San Francisco through the founding in 1955 of the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), the nation’s first lesbian-rights organization, and for association with Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, both pioneering lesbian-rights and feminist activists. Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin were both internationally known lesbian-rights activists with deep roots in the LGBTQ civil rights movement and were also the first same-sex couple to be married in San Francisco in 2004 and in 2008. Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon were one of the four couples that founded the Daughters of Bilitis in San Francisco and they often hosted DOB parties and fundraising events in their home during the early years of the organization, when it was a secret group. The first national lesbian-rights organization in the United States, Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), was initially organized as a social group where lesbians could meet and socialize. The organization soon added a newsletter, The Ladder, which became an internationally known magazine, and then to develop a network of local chapters and public biennial conventions on issues of importance to lesbians and gay men. 651 Duncan Street was Lyon’s and Martin’s residence and the place that is most representative of their productive lives as activists, organizers, writers, educators, and icons. As outlined in Citywide Historic Context Statement for LGBTQ History in San Francisco, the Lyon-Martin House is associated with significant events and persons under Theme 4: Homophile Movements (1950s to 1960s). The Daughters of Bilitis, Phyllis Lyon, Del Martin, and “…their home in San Francisco’s Noe Valley neighborhood” are also discussed in the National Park Service’s LGBT America, A Theme Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer History.
UPDATE: The Board of Supervisors voted to initiate landmark designation on October 19, 2020. At the February 17, 2021 hearing the Historic Preservation Commission recommended designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on May 11, 2021. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Japanese YWCA/Issei Women's Building, 1830 Sutter Street – San Francisco's 291st Landmark

Japantown YWCAThe Japanese YWCA/Issei Women’s Building is significant for its association with Japanese American history and culture in San Francisco, specifically, with Japanese American women who founded the first independent Japanese YWCA in the United States and commissioned what appears to be the only building purpose-built by and for Issei women in the United States. The building is also significant for its association with the African American civil rights movement, as the building served as the San Francisco chapter of the Committee on Racial Equality (CORE) and was the site of numerous meetings, events, trainings, and gatherings organized to advance the civil rights of African Americans during the 1942-1959 tenancy of the American Friends Service Committee. The building is further significant for its association with the advancement of LGBTQ rights, as the building was the center of civil rights leader Bayard Rustin’s organizing work early in his career ,and was the site of pioneering LGBTQ organization the Mattachine Society’s first convention in 1954. Lastly, 1830 Sutter Street is architecturally significant as the work of master architect Julia Morgan.  

UPDATE: On April 20, 2021, the Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.

 


The Kinmon Gakuen Building, 2031 Bush Street – San Francisco's 288th Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe Kinmon Gakuen Building is significant for its association with the social, cultural, and educational enrichment of Japanese Americans in San Francisco during the twentieth century as the home of Japanese language and culture school, Kinmon Gakuen (“Golden Gate Institute”), from 1926 to the present. It is also associated with the experience of the Japanese community in San Francisco during World War II and following the signing of Executive Order No. 9066 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1942. The building was used as a processing center where citizens and non‐citizens of Japanese ancestry were required to report before being relocated to concentration camps across the country. The building is also significant for its association with community organizing and activism among African Americans in San Francisco during the twentieth century. The center provided African Americans, especially youth, with a space for social, educational, and recreational opportunities. Lastly, the building itself is an excellent example of an educational building designed in the Mediterranean Revival architectural style in San Francisco, a popular design aesthetic for school buildings during the 1920s and 1930s.

UPDATE: At the February 6, 2019 hearing the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on October 22, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Paper Doll Bar, 524 Union Street – San Francisco's 287th Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe Paper Doll Bar is significant as one of the earliest lesbian bars and helped to contribute to the development of LGBTQ communities in San Francisco. The Paper Doll is also significant for its association with Dante Benedetti. As the owner of the Paper Doll, he became one of the people on the front lines in the fight for LBGTQ civil rights in San Francisco in the 1950s.

UPDATE: At the September 5, 2018 hearing the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on June 18, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Sunshine School, 2728 Bryant Street – San Francisco's 286th Landmark

exterior view of buildingBuilt in 1935-37 as a as a Public Works Administration (PWA) project for the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), the Sunshine School was planned in consultation with public health professionals and teachers experienced in instructing disabled and chronically ill students. It was a collaborative venture of four prominent architects: Albert A. Schroepfer, Charles F. Strothoff, Martin J. Rist, and Smith O’Brien. With a barrier‐free first floor level, the Sunshine School anticipated by decades the passage of the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) of 1968 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style with Moorish and Art Deco detailing, the former Sunshine School is an excellent and well‐preserved public school constructed during the height of San Francisco’s “Golden Age” of school construction.
UPDATE: At the October 18, 2017, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on March 5, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Theodore Roosevelt Middle School, 460 Arguello Boulevard – San Francisco's 285th Landmark

exterior view of buildingTheodore Roosevelt Middle School is an excellent and well‐preserved public school built during the “Golden Age” of school construction in San Francisco. Designed by master architect Timothy Pflueger of Miller & Pflueger Architects, Roosevelt is one of San Francisco’s most idiosyncratic buildings due to its unique Dutch/German Expressionist styling. It is the only building in San Francisco (and possibly the United States) known to be designed in this avantgarde style. Theodore Roosevelt Middle School is significant for its association with master architect Timothy Pflueger, one of the most talented and influential architects to have worked in San Francisco
during the first half of the twentieth century. Roosevelt is also significant for its association with high artistic values, in particular its three well‐preserved New Deal murals, including a pair in the main lobby by Horatio Nelson Poole and one above the second‐floor entrance to the auditorium by George Wilson Walker.
UPDATE: At the October 18, 2017, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on March 5, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Benedict-Gieling House, 22 Beaver Street – San Francisco's 284th Landmark

exterior view of buildingConstructed circa 1870 by a silver refiner named Jacob Benedict and his family, the Benedict-Gieling House and its carriage house is a very early and well-preserved example of an Italianate villa located within a landscaped garden setting. The house embodies many characteristics of the Italianate villa type, including its portico, tower, cross-gable roof, bracketed cornice, fluted door and window trim, and segmental-arched windows with bracketed hoods. In contrast to the much more common Italianate rowhouse which usually has only one ornamented façade, there is Italianate detailing on three of its four exterior elevations, indicating that it was meant to be appreciated within its landscaped garden setting unobscured by adjoining buildings. It slowly deteriorated as a boarding house in the 1940s through 1950s until 1964 when John and Imogene “Tex” Gieling carefully began restoration.
UPDATE: At the September 19, 2018 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on February 12, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Dunham, Hayden & Carrigan Building, 2 Henry Adams Street – San Francisco's 283rd Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe building is significant for its long-term association with the Dunham, Carrigan & Hayden Company, a business that was important to San Francisco history for decades and that contributed directly, through its products, to the Gold Rush, the post 1906 reconstruction of the City, and to its growth as a metropolis of the Pacific Coast. 2 Henry Adams Street is also associated with the City’s post-earthquake reconstruction period architecture. The heavy timber frame, masonry building was designed by architect Leo J. Delvin in 1915 in the early-twentieth century American Commercial style.
UPDATE: The Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation on November 7, 2018. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on January 15, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Hotel Utah, 500-504 4th Street – San Francisco's 282nd Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe Hotel Utah is a rare remaining example of the numerous residential hotels built in the South of Market neighborhood in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Constructed largely to house itinerant and seasonal workers employed in nearby factories and industries along the waterfront, the hotel is emblematic of a pattern of the development in South of Market that began in the mid‐1800s and continued through the post‐1906 earthquake and fire reconstruction. The hotel is particularly notable for surviving the large‐scale redevelopment of South of Market during the mid-twentieth century during which much of the building stock, including nearly all the residential hotels, dating to the period when the neighborhood served as the city’s industrial and manufacturing center was razed. With its ornate millwork, rounded and angled bays, the Hotel Utah is also a striking example of Edwardian style architecture commonly employed in the design of residential hotel buildings constructed during the period.
UPDATE: At the March 21, 2018 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on October 23, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Pile Drivers, Bridge and Structural Ironworkers Local No. 77 Union Hall, 457 Bryant Street – San Francisco's 281st Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe Pile Drivers, Bridge and Structural Ironworkers Local No. 77 Union Hall is one of the early extant union halls in San Francisco that played an important role in the growth of organized labor in the city. Constructed shortly after the 1906 Earthquake and Fire, the building is also associated with the post disaster reconstruction era in San Francisco.
UPDATE: At the March 21, 2018 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on October 23, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


New Pullman Hotel, 228-248 Townsend Street – San Francisco's 280th Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe New Pullman Hotel is as a rare remaining example of the once numerous residential hotels built in the South of Market during the post 1906‐earthquake and fire reconstruction period and as the primary lodging venue in San Francisco for African American railroad workers, including Pullman porters and maids, during the first half of the twentieth century. As a group, Pullman porters and maids are nationally significant for establishing the first all‐Black union in the country, contributing to the development of the African American middle class, and laying important foundations for the Civil Rights Movement. 228‐248 Townsend Street is the only known property in San Francisco that has strong associations with Pullman porters and maids.
UPDATE: At the March 21, 2018 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on October 23, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Arthur H. Coleman Medical Center, 6301 Third Street – San Francisco's 279th Landmark

exterior view of buildingThe Arthur H. Coleman Medical Center is significant for its association with Dr. Arthur H. Coleman, a nationally prominent African American lawyer-physician and influential healthcare and civil rights advocate. Dr. Coleman purchased the property at 6301 Third Street to construct a purpose-built medical facility to serve Bayview residents. Opening in 1960, the Arthur H. Coleman Medical Center reflected the popular architectural styles of the period, and served as a modern symbol of community health, progress, and success. He recruited a team of African American physicians to join him in his vision of providing comprehensive health services to the area’s low-income African American residents. Dr. Coleman was celebrated as a local pioneer in the nationally significant community health center movement that began in the 1960s, worked tirelessly to achieve racial equity within the healthcare system and the medical profession, and advocated for the needs of the Bayview’s African American community.
UPDATE: At the April 18, 2018 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on July 31, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Phillips Building, 234-246 First Street – San Francisco's 278th Landmark

exterior view of Phillips building Designed in 1930 by prominent local architects Henry H. Meyers and George R. Klinkhardt, the Phillips Building is significant as a distinctive and intact example of the Art Deco style, a comparatively rare style in San Francisco. The building was constructed to house the new printing operation of the Phillips & Van Orden Company, which occupied the building from 1930 until approximately 1947.
UPDATE: At the December 6, 2017 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on June 26, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


New Era Hall, 2117-2123 Market Street – San Francisco's 277th Landmark

exterior view of New Era Hall New Era Hall is one of only nine known purpose-built social halls with commercial spaces designed in the Classical Revival style with Craftsman details by master architect August Nordin. Completed just seven months after the 1906 Earthquake and Fire, New Era Hall provided crucial meeting space for organizations displaced by the disaster, such as the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and the Woodmen of the World. It also housed the Visalia Stock Saddle Company, a pioneer Mexican-American business that developed what is today known as the "western saddle." The building uses an innovative structural system in order to avoid the need for structural support columns, thus creating large, open assembly spaces while conserving building materials.
UPDATE: At the December 7, 2016 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on March 28, 2018. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Gaughran House, 2731-2735 Folsom Street – San Francisco's 276th Landmark

detailed view of front of house showing curved bay windows Constructed in 1900 for James Gaughran, the original owner, the Gaughran House is characteristic of pre-1906 construction that occurred following improved transit routes in the Mission District, which is considered the first southerly "streetcar suburb" of San Francisco. With its rusticated ground floor, a tripartite composition, molded surrounds, exuberant surface ornamentation, and arched openings, Gaughran House is a notable work of local master architect James Francis Dunn (1874-1921) and a fine example of residential Beaux-Arts architecture. The building is clearly identifiable as a James Dunn building, especially with its intricately molded balcony topped by an elaborate wrought iron railing – a feature that Dunn frequently used in his apartment building designs.
UPDATE: At the March 15, 2017 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on December 15, 2017. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Third Baptist Church Complex, 1399 McAllister Street – San Francisco's 275th Landmark

street view of third baptist church on mcallister street Founded in 1852 as the First Colored Baptist Church of San Francisco, Third Baptist Church (renamed in 1855) was the first African American Baptist congregation formed west of the Rocky Mountains and remained the only black Baptist church in San Francisco until the early 1940s. Third Baptist Church has played an important role in promoting black community leadership as well as the social, economic, and political advancement of African Americans in San Francisco. Reverend Frederick Douglas Haynes Sr., emerged as a highly influential leader in San Francisco's civil rights movement and in 1945 was the first African American to run for a position on the Board of Supervisors. Although he never held office, in 1996, the subsequent pastor of Third Baptist Church, Reverend Dr. Amos C. Brown, became the city's second African American member of the Board of Supervisors. The property at 1399 McAllister Street is among several African American protestant churches constructed in San Francisco during the postwar period and one of the first churches in the city to brake from the traditional representations of ecclesiastical design with a new, simplified architectural expression that was thought to better articulate Protestant beliefs.
UPDATE: At the July 19, 2017 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on November 14, 2017. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


El Rey Theater, 1970 Ocean Avenue – San Francisco's 274th Landmark

exterior view of El Ray Theater on Ocean Avenue Designed in the Art Deco style by master architect Timothy Pflueger, and built in 1931, the 1,800‐seat El Rey Theater is one of San Francisco's only Art Deco movie theaters and the biggest in the West of Twin Peaks area. The stepped, 150‐foot tower, originally capped by an aircraft beacon, soars above the surrounding district. Named El Rey – "The King" in Spanish – the former theater, which was most recently used as a church, continues to be the neighborhood's foremost visual landmark. Timothy Pflueger, the architect of El Rey, is one of San Francisco's top architects of the twentieth century. El Rey is one of only three theaters in the city that retains its original Pflueger designed auditorium. Built to serve the new residence parks and streetcar suburbs of the fast‐growing West of Twin Peaks area, El Rey was perhaps the grandest of all the so‐called "neighborhood theaters" that proliferated along major commercial corridors in the city's outlying neighborhoods between the First and Second World Wars.
UPDATE: At the January 18, 2017 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on July 18, 2017. Click here to read more and the designation of San Francisco's 274th landmark: El Rey Theater Landmark Designation Report.


Ingleside Presbyterian Church and the Great Cloud of Witnesses, 1345 Ocean Avenue – San Francisco's 273rd Landmark

Interior of Ingleside Presbyterian Church showing Great Cloud of Witnesses mural With its tripartite composition, symmetrically composed façade, dentiled cornice, and centrally located, full-height portico capped with a pediment and supported by Ionic columns and pilasters, the Ingleside Presbyterian Church illustrates the distinctive characteristics of the Neoclassical style as designed by master Architect Joseph Leonard. The interior of the church houses  a collage-mural entitled The Great Cloud of Witnesses, which consists of newspaper and magazine clippings, posters, framed prints, and painted murals that have been pasted to the walls of all three levels. What began as Reverend Gordon's simple mission to provide images of role models to the community's youth has resulted in an awe-inspiring Folk Artist Environment that greatly contributes to the body of American and African American Folk Art and serves as an extraordinary, unparalleled visual documentation of national and San-Francisco-specific African American history.
UPDATE: At the July 1, 2016 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation amendment. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation amendment on November 15, 2016. Click here to read more about the designation of San Francisco's 273rd landmark: Ingleside Presbyterian Church and the Great Cloud of Witnesses Landmark Designation Report.


Alemany Emergency Hospital and Health Center, 35-45 Onondaga Avenue – San Francisco's 272nd Landmark

Kinmon Gakuen The Alemany Emergency Hospital and Health Center were designed by City Architect, Charles H. Sawyer, and constructed in 1933. In addition to providing vital public health services for the Excelsior district, the Health Center contains two frescoes which were funded by the State Emergency Relief Administration and designed by the prominent artist, Bernard Zakheim.
UPDATE: At the February 17, 2016 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 35-45 Onondaga Avenue, the Alemany Emergency Hospital and Health Center, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on June 7, 2016. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 272nd landmark: 35-45 Onondaga Avenue Landmark Designation Report


Bourdette Building, 90-92 Second Street – San Francisco's 271st Landmark

Burdette Building, 90 Second Street Built in 1903-1904, the Bourdette Building is a remarkable survivor of the 1906 Earthquake and Fire. Among the more than 28,000 buildings that were destroyed during the disaster, it is the only building located within the burned districts to survive intact with no one inside or outside the building fighting to save it from the flames.
UPDATE: At the July 1, 2015 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 90-92 Second Street, the Bourdette Building, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on May 10, 2016. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 271st landmark: Bourdette Building Landmark Designation Report.


Cowell House, 171 San Marcos Avenue – San Francisco's 270th Landmark

Cowell House Built in 1933, the Cowell House is the first known Modern residential building in San Francisco. It was designed by the architects Morrow (Irving) & Morrow (Gertrude), the designers of the Golden Gate Bridge. It reflects an early fusion of International Style, Streamline Moderne, and Second Bay Tradition. It was commissioned by Olive Thompson Cowell, founder of the International Relations Department at San Francisco State University. Henry Cowell, Olive's step-son and an innovative "ultra-modern" composer and pianist, played many concerts in the living room of the Cowell House.
UPDATE: At the July 15, 2015 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 171 San Marcos Avenue, the Cowell House as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on April 12, 2016. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 270th landmark: Cowell House Landmark Designation Report.


University Mound Old Ladies' Home, 350 University Street – San Francisco's 269th Landmark

University Mound Old Ladies' Home, 350 University Street With its front door accentuated by a broken pediment, recessed tetrastyle portico supported by tall slender columns, numerous fanlights and multi‐pane windows, and symmetrically composed façade, the University Mound Old Ladies' Home illustrates the distinctive characteristics of the Colonial Revival style that was popular following the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg in the late 1920s. Constructed in 1931‐1932, the building represents the work of two master architects, Martin J. Rist and Alfred I. Coffey, both separately and in partnership were well known for their designs of institutional buildings, such as schools and hospitals.
The University Mound Old Ladies' Home was founded in 1884 with a $100,000 bequest from James Lick, one of the wealthiest men in California at that time. It originally sat on 25 acres of land which was farmed to provide food for the elderly women of modest means who lived there. The University Mound Old Ladies' Home was in operation for 130 years until 2014 when it was sold to a new nursing home provider.
UPDATE: At the May 20, 2015 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 350 University Street, University Mound Old Ladies' Home as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation in November 2015. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 269th landmark: University Mound Old Ladies' Home Landmark Designation Report.


R. (Rube) L. Goldberg Buildinge 182-198 Gough Street – San Francisco's 268th Landmark

Rube Goldeberg Building The R.(Rube) L. Goldberg Building is significant as an early 20th century mixed-use building designed with Classically-inspired ornament and containing extraordinarily rare, intact storefronts. On its upper floors, the building features rusticated stucco cladding, bay windows flanked by pilaster panels, molded window surrounds with keystones, and a bracketed cornice and shaped parapet. The ground floor contains three historic storefronts displaying a remarkable state of preservation, including original bulkheads, display windows, vestibule paving, doors, and transom. The storefronts rank among the best preserved storefronts of their age. The property is also significant as the work of master architect, Bernard J. Joseph. The building is named after the Pulitzer-Prize winning cartoonist, sculptor, and author Rueben (Rube) Garnett Lucius Goldberg, and served as Goldberg's San Francisco residence and studio.
UPDATE: On November 19, 2014, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 186-198 Gough Street, the R.L. Goldberg Building. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on May 12, 2015, and on May 21, 2015 the Mayor signed designating ordinance. Click here to read more about the designation of San Francisco's 268th landmark: R.L. Goldberg Building Designation Report.: R.L. Goldberg Building Landmark Designation Report.


Swedish American Hall, 2168 Market Street – San Francisco's 267th Landmark

Swedish American Hall, 2168 Market Street Built in 1907, the Swedish American Hall was designed by master architect August Nordin. It continues to serve as a cultural center for the Swedish American community and is significant for its cultural history and chalet-inspired architectural design.
UPDATE: At its November 19, 2014 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation the Swedish American Hall as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on April 28, 2015. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 267th landmark: Swedish American Hall Landmark Designation Report.


Marcus Books / Jimbo's Bop City, 1712-1716 Fillmore Street – San Francisco's 266th Landmark

Marcus Books / Jimbo's Bop City, 1714-1716 Fillmore Street Built in the 1880s, 1712-1716 Fillmore Street is significant for its association with Jimbo's Bop City – a legendary jazz club in the Fillmore District (1950-1965) – and Marcus Books, the oldest independent African American bookstore in the country. It represents a tangible connection to the post-war African American experience in the Fillmore, the black intellectualism associated with Marcus Books and the shifts in geography and demographics associated with redevelopment in the Western Addition.
UPDATE: At the September 18, 2013 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 1712-1716 Fillmore Street, Marcus Books/Jimbo's Bop City, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on February 3, 2014. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 266th landmark: Marcus Books / Jimbo's Bop City Landmark Designation Report


Doelger Homes Sales Office 320-326 Judah Street – San Francisco's 265th Landmark

Doelger Homes Sales Office Built in the Sunset District in 1933 and added to in 1940, the former real estate sales office for residential tract developer Henry Doelger. The building's muscular and eye-catching Streamline Moderne design was an effective marketing tool in promoting Doelger's nearby tract developments.
UPDATE: At the September 19, 2012 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of the Doelger Building, 320-326 Judah Street, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation in April 2013. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 265th landmark: Doelger Building Landmark Designation Report.


Twin Peaks Tavern, 401 Castro Street – San Francisco's 264th Landmark

Twin Peaks Tavern, 401 Castro Street The Twin Peaks Tavern located at 401 Castro Street is associated with LGBT history. It is known as the first gay bar in San Francisco (opened in 1972) to feature large expanses of glass, which revealed rather than obscured the view of bar patrons. Housed in a remodeled turn-of-the-century building in the heart of the Castro, the bar retains its expansive windows and continues to serve the LGBT community.
UPDATE: At the September 19, 2012 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 401 Castro Street, Twin Peaks Tavern, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation in January 2013. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 264th landmark: Twin Peaks Tavern Landmark Designation Report.


Sam Jordan's Bar, 4004 Third Street – San Francisco's 263rd Landmark

Sam Jordan's Bar, 4004 Third Street Sam Jordan's Bar is significant due to its association with the late Sam Jordan, a prominent African American community leader, Golden Gloves champion, pioneering African American business owner along the Third Street corridor in the Bayview District, and the first African American candidate for Mayor of San Francisco (1963). In 1959, Mr. Jordan opened Sam Jordan's Bar in a c.1880's building that was originally constructed adjacent to the corrals, slaughterhouses, and tanneries associated with "Butchertown."
The bar is still in operation and is one of the oldest continuously operating African American businesses along the Third Street corridor. Sam Jordan's Bar was known as an organizing space and catalyst for community-based initiatives and was part of network of African American bars and restaurants that served dual roles as neighborhood-serving charitable and social organizations.
UPDATE: At the June 20, 2012 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation of 4004-4006 Third Street, Sam Jordan's Bar, as an individual landmark. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation in January 2013. Click here to read more about San Francisco's 263rd landmark: Sam Jordan's Bar Landmark Designation Report.


V. C. Morris Gift Shop, 140 Maiden Lane – San Francisco's 72nd Landmark

Interior of V.C. morris Gift Shop Frank Lloyd Wright's 140 Maiden Lane was designated as Landmark No. 72 in 1975. At that time, only the exterior features of the building were designated. In November 2016 the landmark designation was amended to include the double-height, mezzanine-ringed, top-lit circular interior space. Frank Lloyd Wright is by far the most well-know and influential American architect. Although Wright produced several designs for other buildings in San Francisco, the V. C. Morris Gift Shop is the only one that was realized. The V. C. Morris Gift Shop is significant as a rare extant Modern building designed by the master architect.
UPDATE: At the July 1, 2016 hearing, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation amendment. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation amendment on November 15, 2016. Click here to read more about the amended designation of San Francisco's 72nd landmark: V. C. Morris Gift Shop Landmark Designation Report.

Duboce Park Landmark District

report coverThe landmark district contains nearly 90 residential buildings, identified for its exceptional and remarkably intact architectural character, and includes Duboce Park. Buildings within the district were constructed on land originally set aside as a public park. Litigation related to squatter's rights resulted in the partial subdivision of the original park (Duboce Park) into smaller, builder developed parcels. Many of the houses and flats were developed by Fernando Nelson, a prolific Victorian-era builder known for his exuberant ornamentation. This district was identified during the Market and Octavia Area Plan survey efforts.

UPDATE: The Duboce Park Landmark District is San Francisco's 13th Landmark District, and was approved in July 2013. More information is available in the Landmark Designation report.


Market Street Masonry Landmark District

report coverThe Paper Doll Bar is significant as one of the earliest lesbian bars and helped to contribute to the development of LGBTQ communities in San Francisco. The Paper Doll is also significant for its association with Dante Benedetti. As the owner of the Paper Doll, he became one of the people on the front lines in the fight for LBGTQ civil rights in San Francisco in the 1950s.

UPDATE: At the September 5, 2018 hearing the Historic Preservation Commission initiated designation. The Board of Supervisors voted to approve the landmark designation on June 18, 2019. More information is available in the Landmark Designation Report.


Program Outreach

The Department notified owners of all properties under consideration for inclusion on the Work Program of the June 15, 2011 HPC hearing. In addition, the Department notified residential tenants of buildings located within the proposed Duboce Park Landmark Historic District and commercial tenants of all mixed-use and commercial properties. The Department also conducted door-to-door outreach to the commercial tenants of the eight buildings that comprise the proposed discontiguous Market Street Masonry Landmark District.

Mailings and door-to-door-outreach included the following materials:

  • Notice of Public Hearing
  • Landmark Designation FAQ
  • Existing Landmark Districts brochure
  • Department of Parks & Recreation (DPR)-523B form for each individual commercial building (when applicable)

Additional notifications were mailed to the Board of Supervisors, Planning Commission, city agencies, neighborhood groups and individuals on the neighborhood 311 notification lists, and the preservation community notification list.

Planning Department staff is currently tasked with conducting the required additional research, documentation, and public outreach related to the proposed Landmark designations.

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Department of the Interior.

Proposed Individual Landmarks

Peace Pagoda and Plaza, Japantown

Peace Pagoda The Peace Pagoda and Plaza are iconic features of the Japantown neighborhood. Designed by Osaka architecture professor, Dr. Yoshiro Taniguchi, the Peace Pagoda was completed in 1968 as a gift to San Francisco from the people of the city of Osaka, Japan. As with the rest of the Japan Center, the architecture of the Pagoda is influenced by traditional Japanese designs interpreted in contemporary forms and materials. To learn more about this unique structure, click here.

Russell House, 3778 Washington Street

Russell House, 3778 Washington Built in 1950, 3778 Washington Street is one of only two buildings in San Francisco designed by internally renowned master architect Erich Mendelsohn. It retains high integrity and reflects the influence of International Style and the Second Bay Tradition. It is one of Mendelsohn's final designs.

Sunshine School, 2728 Bryant Street

Sunshine School, 2728 Bryant Street Built in 1937 as a Works Progress Administration project (WPA), the Sunshine School was originally constructed as a school for disabled children. It was designed by architects Martin Rist, Charles F. Strothoff, Smith O'Brien, and Albert Schroepfer in a Moorish-Byzantine inspired style. The school is significant for its architecture, its association with the WPA, and its association with Franklin Delano Roosevelt's schools for disabled children.

Samuel Gompers Trade School, 106 Bartlett Street

Samuel Gompers Trade School, 106 Bartlett Street Built in 1937 as a Works Progress Administration project, the Samuel Gompers Trade School was designed in the Streamline Moderne style by architects Masten & Hurd. Influenced by the International Style, the school features striking glass brick-clad stairwell towers. It is currently part of the recently constructed City College Mission Campus complex.

2 Clarendon Avenue

2 Clarendon Avenue Built in 1956, 2 Clarendon Avenue is a rare example of a single-family residential building designed by the local firm Anshen + Allen. The building, located in the Twin Peaks area, is an excellent and unique example of Modern residential design.

3655 Clay Street

3655 Clay Street Built in 1941, 3655 Clay Street is an early Second Bay Tradition design by William Wurster, a pioneer of the San Francisco Bay Area's regional Modernism. Its small-scale, rustic cladding, and minimalist detailing are hallmarks of Wurster's unpretentious Modern aesthetic.

2173 15th Street

2173 15th Street Built circa 1875, this Gothic-inspired single-family residential building is one of the earliest buildings constructed in the Market and Octavia area.

Mothers Building and Fleishhacker Pool Bath House Building

Mothers Building Two buildings located in the San Francisco Zoo are proposed for Landmark Designation: the Mothers Building and the Fleishhacker Pool Bath House.
Each building was constructed in the 1920s adjacent to the Fleishhacker Pool, an enormous outdoor salt water swimming pool (filled in the 1970s) located in what is now the San Francisco Zoo.
Update: The Fleishhacker Pool Building was badly damaged in a fire on December 3, 2012. The building was identified as a life/safety hazard and demolished soon thereafter. It received HABS documentation prior to demolition.

Planters Hotel, 606 Folsom Street

Planters Hotel, 606 Folsom Street The Planters Hotel was designed by Salfield and Kohlberg and constructed in 1906. The building is a rare example of commercial and hotel architecture in the South of Market district built immediately after the 1906 Earthquake and Fires. Its wood frame construction, and wood cladding, is also rare as such construction was disallowed in the aftermath of the fires.

Phillips & Van Orden Building, 234 First Street

Phillips & Van Orden Building, 234 First Street Built in 1930, the Phillips & Van Orden Building was designed in the Art Deco style by architects Henry H. Meyers and George R. Klinkhardt. The building is significant for its architecture and for its association with the Phillips & Van Orden Company, an important publisher and printer in San Francisco, itself the most important publishing center in the West, which occupied the building from 1930 to 1947.

Marine Firemen's Union Headquarters, 240 Second Street

Marine Firemen's Union Headquarters (Pacific Coast Marine Firemen, Oilers, Watertenders and Wipers Association), 240 Second Street Built in 1957, the Marine Firemen's Union Headquarters (Pacific Coast Marine Firemen, Oilers, Watertenders and Wipers Association) was designed in the Late Moderne style and includes significant interior and exterior murals. The building continues to serve as the administrative headquarters and hiring hall for the Marine Firemen's Union, which was founded in 1883 and reorganized in 1907, and is one of the oldest and most important maritime unions based in San Francisco.